Influence of river nile on the egyptian civilization

how did the nile help egypt

The Nile supports agriculture and fishing. Canals bring water from the Nile to irrigate farms and support cities. This is all due to the predictable rise and fall of the Nile's water levels each year, known as inundation rise and relinquishment fall.

However, the silt and sediment that used to flow north, enriching the soil and building the delta, is now building up behind the dam instead.

Early civilization in egypt

Flooding Around September of each year the Nile would overflow its banks and flood the surrounding area. Without it, Egyptian civilization could not have existed. While the majority of Egypt was and still is covered with the aforementioned sand, the river basin next to the Nile boasts wildlife and fertile soils. Besides using the river's natural resources for themselves and trading them with others, early Egyptians also used the river for bathing, drinking, recreation, and transportation. Instead of growing in size through the soil deposits, the delta is now shrinking due to erosion along the Mediterranean Sea. The three most important crops were wheat, flax, and papyrus. This is because the names come from the flow of the Nile River. In addition to irrigating the crops and fertilizing the soil, the Nile's inundation period also supplied much-needed drinking water. The other two seasons were Peret, the growing season, and Shemu, the harvest season. This is all due to the predictable rise and fall of the Nile's water levels each year, known as inundation rise and relinquishment fall. However, the silt and sediment that used to flow north, enriching the soil and building the delta, is now building up behind the dam instead.

Instead of growing in size through the soil deposits, the delta is now shrinking due to erosion along the Mediterranean Sea. The Ancient Egyptians called the Nile the "Aur", which means "black" and comes from the black soil.

nile river valley civilization

Fortunately for Egyptian farmers, fertilizers are commonplace and they use them to offset the change in land fertility. The Nile was not just an agricultural boon for Egypt -- it also was the country's most important roadway, serving as the main thoroughfare to encourage travel and communication capabilities.

Features of egyptian civilization

Papyrus - Papyrus was a plant that grew along the shores of the Nile. It begins in the rivers that flow into Lake Victoria located in modern-day Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya , and empties into the Mediterranean Sea more than 6, kilometers 4, miles to the north, making it one of the longest river in the world. The Nile River also continues to be an important trade route, connecting Africa with markets in Europe and beyond. The Ancient Egyptians found many uses for this plant including paper, baskets, rope, and sandals. The flooding of the Nile was sustainable but not perfectly reliable, creating the belief in gods and social stratification. Over time, the climate became drier as the wetlands turned into the Sahara Desert we know today. The earliest inhabitants along the river found that the river provided many sources of food, and more importantly, discovered an annual 6 month period where the Nile flooded. This is because the names come from the flow of the Nile River. The cycle somewhat reliably repeated every year, although it sometimes produced more water than needed, which had negative effects on the crops. The Nile supported and allowed life to thrive in the grueling climate. Fortunately for Egyptian farmers, fertilizers are commonplace and they use them to offset the change in land fertility. Fortunately for the Egyptians, they knew just how to finesse the Nile and its capabilities to turn what would appear to be a barren wasteland into a thriving empire. Activities Take a ten question quiz about this page. They had absolute power over the dominion which required protection through the help of government officials and soldiers.

The Nile supported and allowed life to thrive in the grueling climate. This gave rise to the belief in the gods and a highly stratified social structure.

They had absolute power over the dominion which required protection through the help of government officials and soldiers.

Influence of river nile on the egyptian civilization

The cause of the flood each year was heavy rains and melting snow to the south near the source of the Nile. The Nile also has served as an important transportation route for thousands of years.

The flooding of the Nile was not a perfect occurrence.

How did the nile river influence the development of egyptian culture

Activities Take a ten question quiz about this page. The Egyptians tried their best to please the gods because if they were happy, then the Nile would flood producing an abundance of crops and preventing famine. This social stratification was necessary for a civilization as large as ancient Egypt to function. In the early s, several dams were built in southern Egypt in an effort to control the sometimes overzealous flooding. Ancient Egyptians used the papyrus plant in many ways, such as making cloth, boxes, and rope, but by far its most important use was in making paper. Through the use of irrigation canals, agriculture was born which paved the way for the emergence of Egyptian civilization. In addition, routine annual flooding no longer occurs along parts of the Nile. In the midst of the desert, however, was a flowing river called the Nile. They divided their calendar up into three seasons. The cycle somewhat reliably repeated every year, although it sometimes produced more water than needed, which had negative effects on the crops. Flooding Around September of each year the Nile would overflow its banks and flood the surrounding area. This looks a bit confusing on a map because Upper Egypt is to the south and Lower Egypt is to the north. The Egyptians also quarried limestone and sandstone from the hills along the side of the Nile. Social mobility was possible in ancient Egypt though. The Nile was not just an agricultural boon for Egypt -- it also was the country's most important roadway, serving as the main thoroughfare to encourage travel and communication capabilities.

After the gods came the pharaohs in social status.

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Ancient Egyptian civilization (article)